Sunday, March 31, 2019

Silent Sunday 3-31-2019



Have a great day!



Saturday, March 30, 2019

Friday Favorites from Climbing Grier Mountain, Inside the Rustic Kitchen, Recipe Runner and More


Good morning! Happy Friday! Are you ready for the weekend? Will you be watching some basketball, getting out to take in a little of the Spring weather or perhaps just relaxing? I am not sure of my plans yet as it is supposed to rain. If it does rain, I have been wanting to experiment with a few new bread recipes. 

Interesting Food


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I am making these Vietnamese Coffee Pancakes with Cinnamon Butter from Climbing Grier Mountain on Sunday because they look delicious! 



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Image Recipe Runner

I made this California Cobb Salad from Recipe Runner this for lunch, it was so refreshing. 




Interesting Articles 






Interesting Entertainment




Interesting Books




In February 1887, Caitriona Wallace and Émile Nouguier meet in a hot air balloon, floating high above Paris, France--a moment of pure possibility. But back on firm ground, their vastly different social strata become clear. Cait is a widow who because of her precarious financial situation is forced to chaperone two wealthy Scottish charges. Émile is expected to take on the bourgeois stability of his family's business and choose a suitable wife. As the Eiffel Tower rises, a marvel of steel and air and light, the subject of extreme controversy and a symbol of the future, Cait and Émile must decide what their love is worth.
Seamlessly weaving historical detail and vivid invention, Beatrice Colin evokes the revolutionary time in which Cait and Émile live--one of corsets and secret trysts, duels and Bohemian independence, strict tradition and Impressionist experimentation. To Capture What We Cannot Keep, stylish, provocative, and shimmering, raises probing questions about a woman's place in that world, the overarching reach of class distinctions, and the sacrifices love requires of us all.




Mary Shelley, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Olive Schreiner and Virginia Woolf: they all wrote dazzling books that forever changed the way we see history. In Outsiders, award-winning biographer Lyndall Gordon shows how these five novelists shared more than talent. In a time when a woman's reputation was her security, each of these women lost hers. They were unconstrained by convention, writing against the grain of their contemporaries, prophetically imagining a different future. 


We have long known the individual greatness of each of these writers, but in linking their creativity to their lives as outcasts, Gordon throws new light on the genius they share. All five lost their mothers in childbirth or at a young age. With no female role model present, they learned from books—and sometimes from an enlightened mentor. Crucially, each had to imagine what a woman could be in order to invent a voice of her own. The passion in their own lives infused their fiction. Writing with passionate intelligence of her own, Gordon reveals that these renegade writers inspired a new breed of women who wished to change a world locked in war, violence, exploitation, and sexual abuse.

Gordon's biographies have always shown the indelible connection between life and art: an intuitive, exciting and revealing approach that has been highly praised. In Outsiders, she crafts nuanced portraits of Shelley, Brontë, Eliot, Schreiner and Woolf, naming each of these writers as prodigy, visionary, 'outlaw,' orator, and explorer, and shows how they came, they saw, and they left us changed. Today, following the tsunami of women's protest at widespread abuse, we do more than read them; we listen and live with their astonishing bravery and eloquence.






Plant Hunters tells the story of our obsession with all things that grow—both for their beauty and their economic potential—and the creation of botanical gardens to cultivate them. This sumptuous, intriguing volume moves from East to West and back again, introducing the botanists, explorers, and empire builders who gathered plants such as the coconut tree, roses, and numerous fruits and vegetables to bring back home. Showcasing hundreds of breathtaking illustrations and historical documents, it examines the species we now take for granted and the plants that have enriched and impoverished nations.




Patina Living


An intimate look at life on Patina Farm enjoying the interplay of rustic and modern European farmhouse charm―including the sheds, outbuildings and well-designed gardens where the Giannettis entertain and enjoy their miniature goats, sheep and donkeys, the chickens and ducks, and dogs. In addition to the home, charming sheds and outbuildings in the Patina landscape are inspiration for a beautiful life in the popular Patina Style.
“We decided to write this book to share why we decided to create this life and what we have learned along the way. We share how we decided where to live, how to design and lay out our property and how to think about the individual spaces. One of the main nuggets of wisdom that we have learned is that there is not only one way to live this life. The idea of this book is to give you some options.



Interesting Finds



I like this shirt for spring and summer. 




These shoes from Rifle Paper Co.  look like Spring to me!





One of my favorite perfumes.



Flower Earring from Target





Flower Plates perfect for Spring, Summer and your Easter table. 



I hope that you have a safe and relaxing weekend. As always, please share your favorite books, podcasts, recipes and whatever else you found interesting this week. 




Thursday, March 28, 2019

Life Lately...Spring Cleaning



Spring cleaning your house is an annual event but have you ever given your life a Spring cleaning? Lately I have been trying to do just that. In the winter I am all about nesting, hibernation and comfort. I find myself going out less, eating more and to be honest, other than my yoga class every morning, getting a little lazy. If it is too cold I use that as an excuse not to get outside and get my 10,000 steps and instead take my pups for walk in the cul de sac. I am less strict about the pasta, pizza and copious amounts of chocolate I consume. Once I see the buds on the trees and the daffodils swaying in the wind I know it is time for me to get going and get motivated.

The last few weeks I have found myself eating more vegetables, salads and fruits, I have limited my pizza and pasta to one meal a week. I have been cleaning the cobwebs out of my mind, as they say, by getting outside, walking by the shore  or thru the neighborhood and taking note of the blooming trees, and even the weeds. I have cleaned out my closet and gotten rid of the pieces that no longer fit or suit my style.
I am back at the library, bringing home stacks of books instead of spending time scrolling thru Instagram and Pinterest. I am growing tired of the changes in the algorithms of social media and lack of control over the things I see and the people I interact with. I personally have always preferred the connection with the people I have met thru blogging as opposed to the "perfect" world and images of Instagram and Pinterest. That said, I have purged my feeds, and have unfriended, unfollowed, and unliked people and pages that don't connect with or like their message.

I am making plans for upcoming trips and looking forward to warm sunny days and time with family and friends this spring and summer. I have a little more spring cleaning to do on myself but this is what I have been up to lately. 

Do you spring clean your life as well as your house? What are some of the things that you do to make a fresh start for spring and summer and shed the weight of a long winter?

I hope that you have a great day!




Wednesday, March 27, 2019

10 Books About Music


Good morning! I hope that you had a great weekend. Mine was fabulous, the weather was beautiful, warm, sunny and a little breezy. I sat outside for hours this weekend reading and soaking up the sun. We took long walks with the pups, my husband grilled and we relaxed and rejuvenated. 

This week I thought I would share some of my favorite books about music. 







How does a simple piece of wood become the king of instruments?
The violin does something remarkable, magical, and evocative. It is capable of bringing to life the mathematical marvels of Bach, the moan of a Gypsy melody, the wounded dignity of Beethoven's Concerto in D Major. No other instrument is steeped in such a rich brew of myth and lore—and yet the making of a violin starts with a simple block of wood. The Violin Maker takes the reader on a journey as that block of wood, in the hands of a master craftsman, becomes an instrument to rival one made by the greatest master of all time.






In the sweeping tradition of The English Patient, Janice Y.K. Lee's debut novel is a tale of love and betrayal set in war-torn Hong Kong. In 1942, Englishman Will Truesdale falls headlong into a passionate relationship with Trudy Liang, a beautiful Eurasian socialite. But their affair is soon threatened by the invasion of the Japanese as World War II overwhelms their part of the world. Ten years later, Claire Pendleton comes to Hong Kong to work as a piano teacher and also begins a fateful affair. As the threads of this spellbinding novel intertwine, impossible choices emerge-between love and safety, courage and survival, the present, and above all, the past.







On September 23, 1939, Wladyslaw Szpilman played Chopin's Nocturne in C-sharp minor live on the radio as shells exploded outside—so loudly that he couldn't hear his piano. It was the last live music broadcast from Warsaw: That day, a German bomb hit the station, and Polish Radio went off the air.
Though he lost his entire family, Szpilman survived in hiding. In the end, his life was saved by a German officer who heard him play the same Chopin Nocturne on a piano found among the rubble. Written immediately after the war and suppressed for decades, The Pianist is a stunning testament to human endurance and the redemptive power of fellow feeling.








Thad Carhart never realized there was a gap in his life until he happened upon Desforges Pianos, a demure little shopfront in his Pairs neighborhood that seemed to want to hide rather than advertise its wares. Like Alice in Wonderland, he found his attempts to gain entry rebuffed at every turn. An accidental introduction finally opened the door to the quartier’s oddest hangout, where locals—from university professors to pipefitters—gather on Friday evenings to discuss music, love, and life over a glass of wine.

Luc, the atelier’s master, proves an excellent guide to the history of this most gloriously impractical of instruments. A bewildering variety passes through his restorer’s hands: delicate ancient pianofortes, one perhaps the onetime possession of Beethoven. Great hulking beasts of thunderous voice. And the modest piano “with the heart of a lion” that was to become Thad’s own.





Taking on prominent thinkers who argue that music is nothing more than an evolutionary accident, Levitin poses that music is fundamental to our species, perhaps even more so than language. Drawing on the latest research and on musical examples ranging from Mozart to Duke Ellington to Van Halen, he reveals:

• How composers produce some of the most pleasurable effects of listening to music by exploiting the way our brains make sense of the world
• Why we are so emotionally attached to the music we listened to as teenagers, whether it was Fleetwood Mac, U2, or Dr. Dre
• That practice, rather than talent, is the driving force behind musical expertise
• How those insidious little jingles (called earworms) get stuck in our head

Los Angeles Times Book Award finalist, This Is Your Brain on Music will attract readers of Oliver Sacks and David Byrne, as it is an unprecedented, eye-opening investigation into an obsession at the heart of human nature.







Claude Debussy (1862-1918) was that rare creature, a composer who reinvented the language of music without alienating the majority of music lovers. The creator of such classics as La Mer and Clair de Lune, of Pelléas et Mélisande and his magnificent, delicate piano works, he is the modernist everybody loves, the man who drove French music into entirely new regions of beauty and excitement at a time when old traditions--and the overbearing influence of Wagner--threatened to stifle it. As a central figure at the birth of modernism, Debussy's influence on French culture was profound. Yet at the same time his own life was complicated and often troubled by struggles over money, women, and ill-health. Walsh's engagingly original approach is to enrich a lively account of this life with brilliant analyses of Debussy's music: from his first daring breaks with the rules as a Conservatoire student to his mature achievements as the greatest French composer of his time. The Washington Post called Stephen Walsh's Stravinsky "one of the best books ever written about a composer." Debussy is a worthy successor.






John Eliot Gardiner grew up passing one of the only two authentic portraits of Bach every morning and evening on the stairs of his parents’ house, where it hung for safety during World War II. He has been studying and performing Bach ever since, and is now regarded as one of the composer’s greatest living interpreters. The fruits of this lifetime’s immersion are distilled in this remarkable book, grounded in the most recent Bach scholarship but moving far beyond it, and explaining in wonderful detail the ideas on which Bach drew, how he worked, how his music is constructed, how it achieves its effects—and what it can tell us about Bach the man.

Gardiner’s background as a historian has encouraged him to search for ways in which scholarship and performance can cooperate and fruitfully coalesce. This has entailed piecing together the few biographical shards, scrutinizing the music, and watching for those instances when Bach’s personality seems to penetrate the fabric of his notation. Gardiner’s aim is “to give the reader a sense of inhabiting the same experiences and sensations that Bach might have had in the act of music-making. This, I try to show, can help us arrive at a more human likeness discernible in the closely related processes of composing and performing his music.”

It is very rare that such an accomplished performer of music should also be a considerable writer and thinker about it. John Eliot Gardiner takes us as deeply into Bach’s works and mind as perhaps words can. The result is a unique book about one of the greatest of all creative artists. 





In the days before his fortieth birthday, London-based journalist Jasper Rees traded his pen for a French horn that had been gathering dust in the attic for more than twenty-two years and, on a lark, played it at the annual festival of the British Horn Society. Despite an embarrassingly poor performance, the experience inspired Rees to embark on a daunting, bizarre, and ultimately winning journey: to return to the festival in one year's time and play a Mozart concerto—solo—to a large paying audience.
A Devil to Play is the true story of an unlikely midlife crisis spent conquering eighteen feet of wrapped brass tubing widely regarded as the most difficult instrument in the world to master—an endearing, inspiring tale of perseverance and achievement, relayed masterfully, one side-splittingly off-key note at a time.







The hero of this sensational first novel is an alto-sax virtuoso trying to evolve a personal style out of Coltrane and Rollins. He also happens to be a walking, talking, Blake- and Shakespeare-quoting bear whose musical, spiritual, and romantic adventures add up to perhaps the best novel, ursine or human, ever written about jazz. "Poignant and touching moments combine with hilarious descriptions of the bear's struggle in a story that anyone — whether familiar with jazz or not — will find compelling and entertaining."—David Amram, Los Angeles Times Book Review "Zabor's knack for detail makes the absurd premise believable . . . and neatly turns the weighty subject — the painful and ungainly growth of an artist — into a comic gem."—The New Yorker  "In fluent, witty prose Zabor conveys with remarkable vividness the texture of group improvisation. . . . It swings."—A. O. Scott, New York Newsday"Sometimes you get the bear and sometimes the bear gets you. Get the Bear."—David Nicholson, Washington Post  "Zabor . . . conveys the mingled joy and terror of musical improvisation. He also displays a mean wit."—New York Times Book Review One of the Los Angeles Times Book Review's 100 best books of 1997 Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction






Grace once had the beginnings of a promising musical career, but she hasn’t been able to play her cello publicly since a traumatic event at music college years ago. Since then, she’s built a quiet life for herself in her small English village, repairing instruments and nurturing her long- distance affair with David, the man who has helped her rebuild her life even as she puts her dreams of a family on hold until his children are old enough for him to leave his loveless marriage.

But when David saves the life of a woman in the Paris Metro, his resulting fame shines a light onto the real state of the relationship(s) in his life. Shattered, Grace hits rock bottom and abandons everything that has been important to her, including her dream of entering and winning the world’s most important violin-making competition. Her closest friends—a charming elderly violinist with a secret love affair of his own, and her store clerk, a gifted but angst-ridden teenage girl—step in to help, but will their friendship be enough to help her pick up the pieces?

Filled with lovable, quirky characters, this poignant novel explores the realities of relationships and heartbreak and shows that when it comes to love, there’s more than one way to find happiness.



I hope that you have a great day! Please share your favorite music books, music, composers, etc.



NOTE: This post contains affiliate links. 

Saturday, March 23, 2019

Saturday Selection Shoes Finds from Anthropologie 20% Off


Good evening! I hope that you had a wonderful and relaxing day. I am a little late but I thought I would share a few of my finds from Anthrolpolgie, they are 20% off this weekend. 





Beaded Mules perfect for Spring and Sumer. 































Have a great night!






Friday Favorites from Wild, Wild Whisk, Simply Delicious, Aberseen's Kitchen and More.



Good morning! I hope that you had a great week and that you are starting to see signs of Spring and maybe having a bit of Spring weather. The weather here has been warm, cold, sunny, rainy and that is all in about an hour. I don't think that we are really going to see Spring weather until May and honestly  I am ok with that, I am not ready yet for the humidity and heat. 


Interesting Food


As it is Spring I thought you might enjoy a few "spring" like foods. 


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Doesn't this Lemon French Toast with Strawberries from Simply Delicious look delicious? I think I might make this for breakfast on Sunday!



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Blueberry Scones from Wild, Wild Whisk are perfect for breakfast of for afternoon tea. 



Spring Salad
Doesn't this Spring Salad from Aberdeen's Kitchen look refreshing?



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Latte drinkers you will love this Honey Coconut Latte.


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Strawberries and Cream Filled Butter Cake the perfect dessert for a beautiful Spring day. 


Interesting Articles







Interesting Movies







Interesting Books




I am so excited to let you know about The Happiness Playlist: The True Story of Healing MY Heart with Feel Good Music because it was/is written by my cousin Mark Mallman. 

Minneapolis rock legend Mark Mallman woke at 3 a.m. with a crushing panic attack that wouldn't end. He responded by pouring songs into a happiness playlist and leaning on the wisdom of friends. This is the true story of a man beset by grief, healed by music, and learning to laugh through it all.
Praise:
“Mark Mallman is legitimately original, exclusively motivated by a desire to conquer the strange obstructions he builds inside his mind." — Chuck Klosterman, author of Fargo Rock City: A Heavy Metal Odyssey in Rural North Dakota.
“This brave and masterfully written book is a testament to the power of love and art. Read it and become obsessed." — Diablo Cody, Academy Award-winning screenwriter of Juno and creator of United States of Tara.









“A ripping, riveting murder mystery — wily as Agatha Christie, charged with real menace, real depth. Perfect for fans of Ruth Ware.” – A.J. Finn, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Woman in the Window

During the languid days of the Christmas break, a group of thirtysomething friends from Oxford meet to welcome in the New Year together, a tradition they began as students ten years ago. For this vacation, they’ve chosen an idyllic and isolated estate in the Scottish Highlands—the perfect place to get away and unwind by themselves.
The trip began innocently enough: admiring the stunning if foreboding scenery, champagne in front of a crackling fire, and reminiscences about the past. But after a decade, the weight of secret resentments has grown too heavy for the group’s tenuous nostalgia to bear. Amid the boisterous revelry of New Year’s Eve, the cord holding them together snaps.
Now, on New Year’s Day, one of them is dead . . . and another of them did it.



Pacific Natural


Jenni Kayne embodies an effortless aesthetic, where natural beauty is found in every detail. Pacific Natural illustrates Jenni's conscious way of living through personal anecdotes and tips with Jenni's home state of California serving as the backdrop. Organized by season, this entertaining book is your guide to creating special moments with family and friends. Each chapter includes tabletop ideas, simple crafts, tips for keeping a stocked kitchen and pantry, what to plant in your garden, and healthy, delicious recipes. From an apple harvest dinner and at-home herb drying in the fall, cocktail parties andDIY gift ideas in the winter, flower arranging in the spring and a beach picnic in the summer, Jenni shares her philosophy for creating traditions and living mindfully all year long.
 
A thoughtful hands-on approach for stylish and balanced living, Pacific Natural shows us how to make the most of the time we spend together, treating life's details with creativity and care.






he Cookie Book includes a wide-range of cookies to fit every type of craving. You'll satisfy a simple mid-week chocolate chip cookie craving by perusing the Hella Chocolate Chip Cookie Chapter (think Big Ass Olive Oil Cookies and Everything Chocolate Chip Cookies). When you're looking to dive a little deeper into butter and sugar you can dabble in Dazzling Drop Cookies (Oatmeal, Blueberry + Puffed Quinoa Breakfast Cookies and Banana Bread Chocolate Chunk Cookies) or jump into the Jazz Hands Chapter and dazzle with Cold Brew Cookies With White Chocolate + Espresso Beans and Burnt Sugar Bark Ginger Cookies.
 
Rebecca has gained a large and loyal following for her sumptuous treats. "Writer, photographer and queen of cookies, Rebecca Firth teases my sweet tooth and I am not mad about it. Love following her and her tempting creations and can't wait to see what she comes up with next." Tiffani Thiessen, actress and author of Pull Up a ChairThe Cookie Book is a beautifully crafted book that will satisfy both long time DisplacedHousewife readers as well as enchant those discovering her for the first time.


Interesting Finds
















Strawberry Bunny Tags are perfect for your Easter baskets or treats. 














Happy weekend and happy Spring my friends. I hope that you share your recipes, finds, pod casts, books, movies and more. I love to read your suggestions and explore your finds. 


Be safe and have a great weekend.