Saturday, May 25, 2019

Friday Favorites from Kitchy Kitchen, The View from the Great Island, Cocoa & Ash and More


Good morning and a happy Friday to you. I was wiped out this week and have been looking forward to Friday since Wednesday. I have no plans this weekend except attending a bbq and getting out on my paddle board. Other than that I plan on reading, relaxing and taking some time to honor those who have lost their lives serving in our Armed Forces.  Do you have plans for the 4 day weekend? 

I hope that you enjoy my favorite finds this week. 


Food

Image Kitchen Kitchen

My mouth is already watering and I cannot wait to make one of these Grilled Everything Burgers from The Kitchy Kitchen


If you do not eat meat but still love burgers, The View from the Great Island taste tested plant based burgers this week, here are the results.



Image

 Potato salad is one of my favorite things I eat at bbqs' and picnics and although I have my own favorite recipe I am always willing to try something new, this weekend I will be making The Best Potato Salad Ever from The Brown Eyed Baker.




Every party needs some chips and dip, I think this Bacon Cheddar Ranch Dip from Cocoa & Ash looks perfect for any celebration. 




If you are looking for a new cocktail this Mixed Berry Sangria from Goodie Godmother looks refreshing. 




You can never go wrong with a Toffee Bar Cheesecake for dessert. 


Interesting Articles 



Beautiful posts and photos of The American Museum & Gardens in Bath.



Movies




The movie Where do we go now? was recommended to me so I have it on my list to watch this weekend. 


Books 

I pre-ordered the 2 books below and cannot wait to read them.






Paris, 1940. With the city occupied by the Nazis, three young seamstresses go about their normal lives as best they can. But all three are hiding secrets. War-scarred Mireille is fighting with the Resistance; Claire has been seduced by a German officer; and Vivienne’s involvement is something she can’t reveal to either of them.
Two generations later, Claire’s English granddaughter Harriet arrives in Paris, rootless and adrift, desperate to find a connection with her past. Living and working in the same building on the Rue Cardinale, she learns the truth about her grandmother – and herself – and unravels a family history that is darker and more painful than she ever imagined.
In wartime, the three seamstresses face impossible choices when their secret activities put them in grave danger. Brought together by loyalty, threatened by betrayal, can they survive history’s darkest era without being torn apart?








‘Let the wind take me and the soft rain settle me into the Irish soil from where I came. And may my sins be forgiven.’


Arethusa Clayton has always been formidable, used to getting her own way.   On her death, she leaves unexpected instructions.   Instead of being buried in America, on the wealthy East Coast where she and her late husband raised their two children, Arethusa has decreed that her ashes be scattered in a remote corner of Ireland, on the hills overlooking the sea.


All  Arethusa ever told Faye was that she grew up in a poor farming family and left Ireland, alone, to start a new life in America as did so many in those times of hardship and famine. But who were her family in Ireland and where are they now?  What was the real reason that she turned away from them?  And who is the mysterious benefactor of a significant share of Arethusa’s estate?  


Arethusa is gone. There is no one left to tell her story.  Faye feels bereft, as if her mother’s whole family has died with her.  Leaving her own husband and children behind, she travels to the picturesque village of Ballinakelly, determined to fulfil her mother’s last wish and to find out the reason for Arethusa’s insistence on being laid to rest in this faraway land.




This week I read the 3 books below and think you might enjoy them as well 




The Fifteen Wonders of Daniel Green



Sometimes wonder is found not beyond the stars, but a few feet from your own front door...
Daniel Green makes crop circles. As a member of a secret organization, he travels across the country creating strange works of art that leave communities mystified.
He's has always been alone; in fact, he prefers it. But when a dying farmer hires him in a last-ditch effort to bring publicity to a small Vermont town, Daniel finds himself at odds with his heart. It isn't long before he gets drawn into a family struggling to stitch itself back together, and the consequences will change his life forever.
For readers seeking the warmth of The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend blended with the creative spark of Rachel Joyce, The Fifteen Wonders of Daniel Green explores the unexplainable bonds of family, the everyday wonder of love, and the strange mysteries life provides that help humanity light up the dark.






For Stella Fortuna, death has always been a part of life. Stella’s childhood is full of strange, life-threatening incidents—moments where ordinary situations like cooking eggplant or feeding the pigs inexplicably take lethal turns. Even Stella’s own mother is convinced that her daughter is cursed or haunted.
In her rugged Italian village, Stella is considered an oddity—beautiful and smart, insolent and cold. Stella uses her peculiar toughness to protect her slower, plainer baby sister Tina from life’s harshest realities. But she also provokes the ire of her father Antonio: a man who demands subservience from women and whose greatest gift to his family is his absence.
When the Fortunas emigrate to America on the cusp of World War II, Stella and Tina must come of age side-by-side in a hostile new world with strict expectations for each of them. Soon Stella learns that her survival is worthless without the one thing her family will deny her at any cost: her independence.
In present-day Connecticut, one family member tells this heartrending story, determined to understand the persisting rift between the now-elderly Stella and Tina. A richly told debut, The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna is a tale of family transgressions as ancient and twisted as the olive branch that could heal them.




The Peacock Feast opens on a June day in 1916 when Louis C. Tiffany, the eccentric glass genius, dynamites the breakwater at Laurelton Hall—his fantastical Oyster Bay mansion, with columns capped by brilliant ceramic blossoms and a smokestack hidden in a blue-banded minaret—so as to foil the town from reclaiming the beach for public use. The explosion shakes both the apple crate where Prudence, the daughter of Tiffany’s prized gardener, is sleeping and the rocks where Randall, her seven-year-old brother, is playing.
Nearly a century later, Prudence receives an unexpected visit at her New York apartment from Grace, a hospice nurse and the granddaughter of Randall, who Prudence never saw again after he left at age fourteen for California. The mementos Grace carries from her grandfather’s house stir Prudence’s long-repressed memories and bring her to a new understanding of the choices she made in work and love, and what she faces now in her final days.
Spanning the twentieth century and three continents, The Peacock Feast ricochets from Manhattan to San Francisco, from the decadent mansions of the Tiffany family to the death row of a Texas prison, and from the London consultation room of Anna Freud to a Mendocino commune. With psychological acuity and aching eloquence, Lisa Gornick has written a sweeping family drama, an exploration of the meaning of art and the art of dying, and an illuminating portrait of how our decisions reverberate across time and space.



Finds







I love this sandal it reminds me of one of my favorite Gucci patterns.








I love this tropical maxi dress from Anthropologie. Don't forget to check out the sale this weekend at Anthropolioge.


I hope that you have a happy and safe weekend. Please share your favorite recipes, podcasts, recipes and whatever else you discovered this week. 






2 comments:

  1. Grilled burgers sounds good. I'll have to see what Nathan's doing. Maybe he could grill some burgers this weekend. Otherwise I eat veggie burgers, which I just love too.
    Brenda

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